Instagram has become not only a way to share photos but a way to meet like minded people doing similar things in life. We follow a lot of other people on Instagram that have or are converting school buses into Tiny Homes. One particular person (@theabominableheidimonster), Heidi Miller had hit us up with a few questions on how we set our Kni-Co wood stove up inside the bus. Brock was heading to Park City, UT in the bus and decided to make a short stop in Moab, UT where Heidi lived to shoot a quick interview. Well, life on the road always has its surprises and after blowing a tire just outside Moab he ended up spending four days helping Heidi with her bus, paddle boarding, biking and a little rock climbing before getting ready to link back in with the rest of the crew.

Once the bus was loaded, Ben Girardi a photographer from SLC, Austin Gibney and Colin Spencer joined the Bus Life Adventure crew to seek out snow in Alaska. It was an interesting drive to say the least and the weather in Alaska proved to be a challenge for finding blue days to film and ride big lines.

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We got a call from our team manager at Never Summer that he and a handful of other team riders were going to be at Sheepshead Cabin for the next handful of days and invited us to join. It was back the way we came from, Wolf Creek Pass, but that's the beauty of the bus. We can go anywhere at anytime with a drop of the hat.

The terrain at Sheepshead proved to be tricky and we only spent a few days there before we decided that Alaska might be the best call being that snow was melting quick and it was only the beginning of March. Cub and Brian took the truck and went back to Denver for jury duty while Brock made the solo trek to Utah to prepare for the drive to AK. On his way home a major problem with the bus brought him to a halt and stranded in Moab for four days.

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With the avalanche conditions on Wolf Creek Pass at an all time high due to the heavy amount of snowfall and high winds, we decided to make our way to Silverton, CO where snow was said to be a bit more stable and had more to offer in terms of safe zones if the conditions didn't permit us to get on anything steep. When we arrived we scouted out a hut called "The Respect Hut" which was tucked away in a high bowl of the Silverton backcountry. With stunning views of the giant peaks we decided to stay in the hut and ride the safer terrain around the area. We were seeing natural, big avalanches on anything steep so we decided to avoid that type of terrain. Sam King and Austin Shelton joined us for the adventure.

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As we tried waiting patiently in Jackson Hole for the storms that were supposed to produce some good snow, our phones and Facebook were being hit with messages of insanely deep snow in Colorado. Upon doing a little research and looking at the radar on NOAA we could see that southern Colorado was about to be hit with what could be a seven foot storm total by the time it was all said and done. The decision was easy. We have the ability to chase storms with the bus and that's exactly what we decided to do. It was roughly 9 hours from Jackson Hole to Buena Vista, CO and that seemed like a good stretch to cover in a day. Unfortunately we hit the storm head on going over Tennessee Pass between Red Cliff and Buena Vista and we limped along at 10 MPH in 4 wheel drive while feeling like we were traveling through space at light speed with the snow flakes blasting our windshield.

The rest of the photos below which have been made interactive by using OVRHD tell the rest of the story. Hover your mouse over or tap if you're on your phone/tablet and click on the information icons to read more about the adventures.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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